Tag Archives: alvarinho

Gual & Baboso

Let me introduce you to Gual and Baboso. No, they are neither law partners nor ice dancers. Gual and Baboso are autochthonous grape varieties that grow on Tenerife in the Canary Islands. These are two of the varieties that are championed at Bodegas Viñátigo, one of several Canary Islands wineries that are just becoming available in the US market thanks to the dedicated efforts of the Bay Area based importer José Pastor.
Founded in 1990, Bodegas Viñátigo makes several unique wines from vineyards in the Ycoden Daute Isora wine region on the western side of Tenerife. Juan Mendez, born and raised on the island, started Viñátigo with the aim of recuperating indigenous grape varieties. His vineyards are all planted on original rootstock in rocky black volcanic soil. Each vine grows in a small depression in the earth to protect it from the ever present trade winds. Indigenous yeasts are used for fermentation. The wines are all produced as single varietals.
The small Viñátigo winery, built from rough hewn local stones, takes advantage of many elements of modern winery design. Wines are moved by gravity rather than pumping from one stage of elaboration to the next. Fresh fruit is delivered to the top level of the winery where sorting and crushing takes place. The wines are fermented in temperature controlled tanks one level down, and bottling and packaging are done on the lowest level.

vinatigo_gual__883332008 Viñátigo Gual
is made from the Gual grape. Cold maceration and fermentation preserve the maximum of aroma and flavor in this richly textured white wine. Green almond and sesame seed aroma blend with tropical citrus flavors. The textural weight comes from extended skin contact. A foundation of volcanic minerality creates a lean, almost austere, first impression. Only with a bit of air does the complex tropical side of the wine come forward. This off beat varietal wine will pair well with elegant seafood preparations featuring scallops and lobster or even the silky monk fish liver preparation known in Japan as ‘ankimo’. $22.99

vinatigo_baboso__220782008 Viñátigo Baboso is made from the red Baboso grape. This dark skinned juicy grape creates bold, expressive wines. In this particular example the ripe fruit character adds contrast to a wine that at its core is deeply mineral and rocky. 10 months in French oak gives this wine tannic structure. Barnyardy aromas of hayloft and meat locker add a note of funky intrigue to this unique expression of local soil and climate. A slow cooked braise of beef and mushrooms would be a nice match here. $42.99

Top Shelf Vinho Verde

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2009 Deu la Deu Alvarinho

Adega de Monção is a cooperative winery in the Vinho Verde region of Portugal. Deu la Deu is the top wine from this well known and well respected winery. It is made of 100% Alvarinho (rare in Vinho Verde) from the highest quality fruit of each vintage. This wine combines the traditional spritzy effervescence and grapefruit aroma of Vinho Verde with a deeper, more expressive balance of aromas and flavors. Notes of white peach and orange blossom combine with finely tuned minerality and leesy textural weight. This well made wine can be enjoyed right away or held back for a few years as they do in Portugal. $19.99

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The Path Less Traveled

Sometimes the most interesting wines are the ones you don’t expect. A little known grape variety or a region that is off the beaten path can provide the most unexpected pleasure.
This week we offer you two examples of unusual wines that will delight your sense of taste as well as your sense of adventure.

2008 Soalheiro Primeiras Vinhas
It used to be that Portuguese Vinho Verde was simple, spritzy, fun in a bottle. While those wines still exist (and we stock them enthusiastically), a new breed of Vinho Verde can be found that features estate grown grapes with distinct pedigree, vintage specific bottlings and finely tuned wine making skills. Soalheiro Alvarinho Primeiras Vinhas is a standard setter for top shelf Vinho Verde. This 100% Alvarinho wine from Soalheiro’s oldest vineyards is crisp and elegant. Greenish tint (from whence the region gets its name) and spritzy effervescence are in keeping with regional style. The use of 100% Alvarinho as well as the detailed level of winemaking skill sets this wine apart from all other wines in the area. Grapefruit aroma and a palate of fresh citrus blossom and flinty minerality give this wine a distinctiveness that is truly unique. This ain’t no back porch Vinho Verde. This is some serious juice! $33.99

2009 Bermejo Tinto ‘Maceracion Carbonica’
Wines from the Canary Islands have been few and far between in the USA but thanks to the intrepid folks at Jose Pastor Selections numerous intriguing bottles from this string of Spanish islands off the coast of Africa are about to become much more prevalent around here. Bermejo Tinto from Lanzarote, made from the local Listan Negro grape, comes in several styles. This one is made in the “Maceracion Carbonica” style (whole cluster fermentation, a technique used to make fresh,youthful wines quickly) and tastes like a French Beaujolais grown in rocky, volcanic soil. Pure, bright fruit character combines with quartz crystal minerality. This light bodied red will work its magic equally with seafood, poultry and meatless meals. $19.99

Paella Class

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Our friends at Kitchen On Fire Cooking School are hosting us once again for our semi-regular Paella class. The date is Monday September 20th at 6:30 PM.

This is a hands-on class that teaches all the skills needed to make fabulous paella in all sizes and flavors. We will work together to make a large  paella that will include meat, chicken, seafood and vegetables. We will also make several quick tapas to nibble on while we wait for the paella to cook as well as a light dessert. Several paella friendly wines will be sampled along the way. Details and registration are all to be found on the Kitchen On Fire web site at:

www.kitchenonfire.com/classes/view/id/1220/

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Springtime New Arrivals

Springtime in the wine business is like a month-long birthday party/baby shower/Christmas morning all rolled into one big fiesta of opening boxes packed with many shiny, colorful objects of desire. This week we are receiving new white and red wines from some of our favorite bodegas.
In a few weeks the new rosados will arrive, as pink and precious as newborn babies.  Aged red wines that have been maturing slowly in dark,cool Spanish cellars are finally ready for release. Take advantage of this season and stock up on the new vintage of well loved favorites as well as several exciting never-before-seen wines.

2009 Ostatu Blanco
The first of the 2009 vintage Spanish white wines to reach our shores is this popular white Rioja. Fashioned from 90% Viura and 10% Malvasia sourced from vines over 60 years old this tank fermented wine is fresh and herbaceous. Crisp minerality balances aromatic floral richness. White Rioja is growing in popularity thanks in part to well made wines such as this. That the wine is such a bargain adds one more reason to put this on your list of new wines to try. $12.99

2009 Laxas Albariño
The newly arrived 2009 Laxas (pronounced like ‘luscious’, with good reason) is a ripe, floral expression of the Albarino grape. A base of lemon and green melon flavors blends well with additional notes of fresh herbs, fennel and background minerality. $17.99

2009 Soalheiro Alvarinho
Vinho Verde
It used to be that Portuguese Vinho Verde was simple, spritzy, fun in a bottle. While those wines still exist (and we stock them enthusiastically), a new breed of Vinho verde can be found that features estate grown grapes with distinct pedigree, vintage specific bottlings and finely tuned wine making skills. Soalheiro Alvarinho is a standard setter for top shelf Vinho Verde. This 100% Alvarinho wine is taut and edgy. A current of electric-like acidity gives a jolt, the blow softened a bit by some well rounded pear/melon fruit character. Light effervescence moderates firm, flinty minerality. This ain’t no back porch Vinho Verde. This is some serious juice! $21.99

2008 Capellanes Joven
Pago de los Capellanes is a well known and respected bodega in the Ribera del Duero region in Northern Spain. In addition to the bold, tannic,barrel matured wines that are the tradition in this region they also make this younger “Joven” style red that sees only 5 months in oak. The firm, chalky tannins are moderated here by juicy dark berry fruit character. Rocky minerality adds counterpoint. The new 2008 vintage is drinking very well right now. $17.99

2005 Ijalba Graciano
In Rioja the Graciano grape represents just 5% of a typical harvest. This dark skinned, tannic grape is often used in small quantities to beef up the lighter textured Tempranillo. Only rarely is Graciano bottled as a varietal wine and then it is usually very expensive. We are happy to see Ijalba Graciano back in the market in the new 2005 vintage. Darker and more tannic than a typical Rioja, this wine possesses a certain delicate element that comes and goes elusively as the wine is consumed. It is firm yet floral, ripe yet tart, bold yet fragile all at once. If you wear your Rioja with a difference, this is the wine for you. $21.99

Rioja Event Reloaded:



Two weeks ago in this space we announced an upcoming tasting of some rare older wines from the iconic Rioja bodega Lopez de Heredia. Well, things have evolved and the tasting has gotten bigger and less expensive simultaneously (how often do you hear that these days?).
The good news is that the importer has agreed to supply more samples for the tasting, so we are able to offer a better price for the event ($15 per person, down from $45). The other good news is that there is space for just 40 guests so reservations are a must.
Where else will you have a chance to try a 1981 white Rioja or a 1987 Tondonia Reserva? We’ll also be tasting the current releases from the 90’s as well as the famous 1970 Bosconia Gran Reserva (about which  The Wine Advocate said:”The 1970 Vina Bosconia Gran Reserva is a captivating effort, with endless, well-defined nuances of pine, minerals and sweet red fruits that emerge from the glass in a breathtaking display of purity and class. It shows the extraordinary length, great expression and the pure breed of a truly great wine. 93 Points”).
Join us at The Spanish Table in Mill Valley on Thursday, April 15th  at 6:30 pm as Maria Jose Lopez de Heredia takes us through her family’s rich history and traditional wine-making process. For reservations please call (415)-388-5043.

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Many Are Tasted, But Few Are Chosen

It is that time of year again.

I speak of the spring tasting season when all the wine importers and distributors conduct tastings for the trade. New wines are featured along with new vintages of familiar favorites. At these events buyers like me get a chance to sniff, sip, compare and contrast dozens (no, hundreds) of wines before choosing what to carry in the store. It all sounds like a fun time and sort of a booze cruise but it is, in fact, a bit of work (yes, I know, poor me).

I used to make a habit of trying all the white wines before moving on to reds but I found that the high acidity of white wines tended to burn out my taste buds early, leaving me with a palate too compromised to accurately taste the red wines. My routine these days is to taste first all the things I am most interested in, switching back and forth between reds and whites. Then I go back and try other wines that I might have missed the first time through. Of course I am not consuming all this wine yet even so after a few hours I have to call it quits because palate fatigue sets in and everything starts tasting the same. Afterwards, with purple teeth, smudgy notes and, most likely, a wine stained shirt I head back home to review my notes and choose what to bring in and sell.

This week I offer you a selection of new arrivals that made the cut. Some of these wines are making a first appearance at The Spanish Table while others have just changed to the latest vintage, warranting repeat investigation.

Laxas 2008 The first 2008 Albariño of the season has arrived. Laxas is a ripe pear and citrus scented wine that displays a greenish tint and a light minerality. This bright, floral white wine is a perfect choice for springtime foods such as fresh cheeses, tender salad greens and fresh vegetables. The price has thankfully not gone up in the new vintage. $17.99

Solar de Serrade Alvarinho 2007 The wine world has ‘discovered’ Portugal (a case of hiding in plain sight, if you ask me) leading to the importation of numerous new and interesting wines that previously never made it out of the country. The Vinho Verde wines of northern Portugal have for many years been associated with cheap, spritzy, non-vintage white wines that are fun, refreshing and simple.  Now we are seeing more elaborate, intriguing wines from this region including this single varietal Alvarinho (Albariño in Spain become Alvarinho in Portugal). The light spritzy effervescence of a typical Vinho Verde is found here with a much drier, more mineral foundation underlying tart citrus fruit character. This crisp, refreshing, low alcohol white wine makes an excellent aperitivo wine as well as a nice accompaniment to lighter meals. $17.99

Muralhas De Monçao Vinho Verde 2007 Another example of the many wonderful wines coming out of Portugal right now, this white wine from the Vinho Verde region is a traditional blend of Alvarinho and Trajadura, bottled with a touch of residual effervescence. Aromas and flavors of white peach and meyer lemon give this wine a bit of roundness to balance the crisp acidity and light minerality. This wine is very popular in Portugal and has happily been showing up around the Bay Area on some by-the-glass lists of numerous restaurants. Try it at home with a big salad and some grilled sardines. $15.99

Mas Malbec 2007 The new 2007 vintage of Mas Malbec serves as a reminder that this has been a consistently solid wine and a customer favorite for several vintages running.  This wine from bodegas Sur de los Andes in Argentina is a private label for the importer Luis Moya who works with the producer to create a young 100% Malbec wine in a well balanced style. Ripe fruit never overwhelms the palate, leaving room for light barrel tannins and rocky minerality. This too is the same price as last vintage. $11.99

Novecento Malbec 2007 As the season changes and the weather warms, I start to bring in more wines intended to accompany outdoor cooking.  This young Malbec from Argentina is expressive and ripe with dark berry fruit fruit character. Dust off the grill, open a bottle of Novocento and start enjoying the sunshine. $10.99

La Planta 2007 Many of you have been waiting for the new vintage of La Planta to arrive. Wait no longer. This lightly oaked red from Bodegas Arzuaga in Ribera del Duero is dark and expressive with earthy nuance and ripe fruit character. Fashioned from the local Tinto Fino grape (Tempranillo by another name) and aged for just a few months in small oak barrels, this wine has a bold character that pairs well with full flavored meaty meals. A mixed grill of chuletas de cordero (lamb chops) and morcilla (blood sausage) would be a perfect pairing here. $15.99

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Buyer’s Choice

Wine drinkers are an opinionated bunch, united by our strongly held though often opposing beliefs about what constitutes ‘the good stuff’.

What one drinker enjoys, another may dislike. Some of us appreciate wines with delicate and subtle characteristics, while others are drawn to wines possessing bold, assertive flavors. My ‘balanced and elegant’ may be your ‘thin and lifeless’.

I am known to tell customers that among the hundreds of wines we carry (548 at last count), you are bound to find wines that you love as well as wines that are not to your taste. That is why we carry such a broad assortment. My job is to buy across a broad spectrum of styles and to steer you toward whatever type of wine you most enjoy.

Of course, when the day is done and I buy a bottle to take home and drink with dinner, I, like you, have my own particular preferences. Occasionally I write about the wines that I personally enjoy, not only as an exercise in shameless self promotion but also as a way to help you gauge what you read here. You can put my opinions in perspective and calibrate my palate to your own if you know what I like.

So this week it’s all about me, me, me.

As a wine buyer I taste boatloads of wines that are varietally and regionally ‘correct’ without being particularly interesting. For each wine that I buy for The Spanish Table, many more have been sampled and rejected for one reason or another. I tend to seek out wines with a noticeable difference from the many lookalike choices crowding the field.

Perhaps it’s my contrarian nature (almost a birthright in Berkeley) or maybe I am simply suffering from palate fatigue after trying so many wines at work, but at home I tend to favor simple wines that express their nature without pretense. A wine from a far flung region made from a little known grape will excite my intellect. A wine with a moderate level of alcohol, well integrated oak (or none at all, even better) and pure, clean fruit character will awaken my senses. The combination of all these elements really captures my attention.

This week I am highlighting some of my current personal favorites that are also appropriate to the autumn season. When you come into the store you will now find a special section labeled ‘Kevin’s Favorites’ with all these wines gathered together in one place. Please give them a try and let me know what you think.

Viña Mein 2007 This wine is fashioned from a blend of 80% Treixadura, 10% Godello, 5% Loureiro, and 1% to 2% each of Albariño, Torrontés, Albilla and Caiño. Bright gold color, fresh melon aroma and bright citrus fruit character never overwhelm the flinty mineral foundation that maintains the lean focus of this unoaked white wine. $19.99

Dorado Alvarinho 2006 Marcial Dorado, from Galicia in Spain, makes this excellent 100% Alvarinho wine in the Vinho Verde region of Portugal. After searching in vain for the perfect Albariño vineyard in Spain, he crossed the Minho River and bought a vineyard of 70 year old Alvarinho located just above the little town of Melgaço where he also built a small gravity fed (no pumping of wine from tank to tank) winery called Quinta do Feital. The unoaked ‘Dorado’, the flagship of the winery, is rich with melon and pear aromas and flavors. Bright acidity punctuates the ripe fruit character, creating a long, lingering finish. A quantum leap in quality compared to just about any other Vinho Verde. $28.99

Gorrondona Tinto 2007 The rare and elusive red Txakoli is difficult to find. These firmly tannic wines are lean and full of mineral flavor, with a gentle fruit character that fades quickly with age. Happily, the new Gorrondona Tinto, made from 100% Hondarribi Beltza (grown in miniscule quantities on ancient vines), is super fresh, with light berry-like fruit character balancing firm minerality. This is an excellent and unusual light red. $27.99

Viña do Burato 2007 This wine from Ribeira Sacra in Northwestern Spain, made from the local Mencía grape, is bright and youthful, medium bodied and relatively low in alcohol (12.5%). Firm minerality and delicate floral aroma combine with gentle fruit character. This small production wine (400 cases in total) is a rare treat from a region that deserves much more attention. $19.99

Tajinaste Tinto Tradicional 2007 This unique wine comes from the Orotava Valley of Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands. Agustín García founded Bodegas Tajinaste in 1981. He produces this wine from the local Listán Negro grape. This unoaked wine (they make a barrel aged red too) is cloudy lavender in color with light texture and sweet floral perfume. Firm minerality creates a foundation which supports fresh mulberry fruit character and gentle tannins. $21.99

 

 

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Arrivals / Departures

In the wine world (and in the rest of life, I suppose) nothing lasts forever. Wines come and wines go. Some diminish in quantity slowly and others disappear in a heart beat, but one way or another they all grow scarce before becoming extinct.

Fortunately for wine drinkers, the joy of a new discovery is matched by the familiar pleasure of a well loved favorite. Exploring new regions and grape varieties is always exciting, but so is revisiting familiar territory to see how a particular wine or producer has evolved over time.

This week we have some fine examples of new wines that are just starting on their journey in the marketplace as well as mature wines that are the last examples of their particular vintage. Check out the following selections from our ever changing collection and act fast if you want to pick up some of the end-of-vintage wines before they are gone.

Here too is a quick recipe using the best of late summer seasonal produce. This recipe comes from the famous Catalan chef Ferran Adrià by way of the increasingly (thanks to his new show on PBS) well known Asturian chef José Andrés. I’ve adapted the recipe a bit to simplify things, but you can find the original version of this recipe along with dozens more in the boxed set of recipe cards called ‘Tapas Deck’ ($14.95 at The Spanish Table) by José Andrés and Richard Wolffe.

 

Tomato and Watermelon Skewers

(Serves 6 as a tapa)

Ingredients:

6cherry tomatoes cut in half

121 inch cubes of freshly cut watermelon

1-tablespoon of fresh lemon juice

1teaspoon lemon zest

¼ cup-sherry vinegar

¼ cup-Spanish extra virgin olive oil

1-tablespoon sea salt

1-tablespoon minced parsley

12toothpicks

Directions:

For the dressing, combine the lemon juice, lemon zest, sherry vinegar, olive oil, salt and parsley in a bowl and mix briefly.

Skewer each tomato half (cut side up) with a toothpick, followed by a watermelon cube on the bottom. Stand the skewers up on a plate. Pour the dressing over the skewered fruit and serve.

 

Aveleda Fonte Vinho Verde The non-vintage version of Aveleda Vinho Verde has just come in with a new look and name. Now called ‘Fonte’, this is in fact the same fresh, spritzy white wine you know and love. Light mineral foundation and abundant citrus aroma and flavor combine to create this uniquely delicious white wine that is low in alcohol and big on refreshment. $7.99

 

Dorado Alvarinho 2006 Marcial Dorado, from Galicia in Spain, makes this excellent 100% Alvarinho wine in the Vinho Verde region of Portugal. After searching in vain for the perfect Albariño vineyard in Spain, he crossed the Minho River and bought a vineyard of 70 year old Alvarinho located just above the little town of Melgaço where he also built a small gravity fed (no pumping of wine from tank to tank) winery called Quinta do Feital. The unoaked ‘Dorado’, the flagship of the winery, is rich with melon and pear aromas and flavors. Bright acidity punctuates the ripe fruit character, creating a long, lingering finish. A quantum leap in quality compared to just about any other Vinho Verde. $28.99

 

Auratus 2007 This blend of two local grapes sourced from the northern end of Portugal is a declassified Vinho Verde (officially it is a ‘Vinho Regional do Minho’) made by Marcial Dorado at Quinta do Feital from a blend of Alvarinho and Trajadura grapes, vinified without any use of oak. The lean, flinty mineral notes from the Trajadura blend effortlessly with the riper melon and citrus scented Alvarinho. This crisp, dry wine will find favor with both Spanish Albarino appreciators as well as Portuguese Vinho Verde drinkers. $17.99

 

Quinta do Infantado Reserva 2003 One of our favorite small Porto producers, Quinta do Infantado, has made their first Reserva level red wine. This dark, rich, elegant blend of traditional Douro region grapes was made from the same field blend as used in the Porto. The fruit was crushed by foot in stone lagares, fermented in tank and then aged for 18 months in oak. This small production wine (just over 500 cases, total production) is expressive and full bodied while retaining a fine balance of aromas and flavors. Dark berry fruit character rounds out brambly herb and mineral back notes. $35.99 (very limited)

 

Rioja Bordon Crianza 2001 The last five cases of this excellent, very well priced, traditionally styled Rioja wine are going fast. A few months ago Jon Bonné from The San Francisco Chronicle described the wine well. He said: “Traditionally made Rioja, in well-worn American oak casks, wears its age remarkably well. More basic Crianza wines are meant to drink young. But this one from Bodegas Franco-Espanolas (founded when 19th-century Frenchmen journeyed south to find a solution to phylloxera that devastated Bordeaux) radiates with all the beauties of aged Rioja. Hints of wood and coriander merge with dried cherries and an almost translucent softness.” $11.99

 

Finca Valpiedra Reserva 2001 We are down to the last few cases of this superlative Rioja from the picture perfect 2001 vintage. This rare single vineyard wine, fashioned from 90% Tempranillo with the balance made up of Cabernet Sauvignon, Mazuelo and Graciano is dark garnet colored with smooth, well integrated oak aroma and tannins adding contrast to the silky, ripe fruit character. In the upcoming 2004 vintage (the wine is only made in the best years) the wine will get the new “vinos de pagos” designation (indicating a wine made from only estate grown fruit and made on the same property as the vineyard) and will go up significantly in price. $23.99

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Portugal On My Mind

At The Spanish Table in Berkeley I buy wines with a very specific national focus. Spain, Portugal, Chile and Argentina. That’s it.

Still, selecting wines from just the countries we represent, I go through periods of intense interest in one style or region or winemaker and I take home lots of wines from wherever/whatever/whomever is my current obsession. Lately I have been really enjoying the wines from Portugal, specifically the reds from the Dão region and the whites from Vinho Verde.

Not so long ago Dão wines were often rustic, chunky reds that displayed little in the way of freshness or complexity. These days, and especially this time of year, I have been enjoying a range of Dão wines, both young and more mature, that show off the improvements in quality for wines from this region.

In Vinho Verde, as with Dão, the quality level is rising with each year. Intrepid importers who once only shipped inexpensive, non-vintage blends for summertime picnics now supply us with some top notch varietal wines from this region on Portugal’s northern border.

As spring continues to unfold in the Bay Area I find that these Portuguese wines match the season perfectly. Lively, youthful aromas, bright fruit character and intriguing mineral notes pair wonderfully with a springtime menu. These wines, many of which have yet to be discovered by food and wine lovers in our little corner of the globe, offer a clear sense of place with styles and characteristics that are distinctly Portuguese.

To get a feeling for these wines, I suggest pairing them with a typical Portuguese dish, and few foods in Portugal are more typical than salt cod. Here is a classic version of a baked casserole that also has the advantage of using up some of those hard boiled Easter eggs that many of you will have on hand right now.

Salt Cod and Potato Casserole – adapted from The Food of Portugal by Jean Anderson

(Serves 6 as a main course)

Ingredients:

1 lb. Dried salt cod fillet

1 Large yellow onion

2 lbs. Yukon Gold (or Russet) potatoes

1/3 cup Minced parsley

1 tblspn. Butter

3 tblspns. Portuguese olive oil

3 Hard boiled eggs, peeled and cut in wedges

12 Oil cured black olives, pitted

1 tblspn. Salt

1 tblspn. Ground black pepper

Directions:

One day ahead, soak the Salt Cod in cold water, changing the water twice in 24 hours.

The next day, drain the Cod and poach it in 1 quart of simmering water on the stove for twenty minutes or until the fish starts to flake apart.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. While waiting for the oven to come up to temperature, slice the onion in thin rings and sauté in a clay cazuela on the stove top with the butter and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil until the onion has softened and taken on a bit of color. Remove the onions when cooked. Peel and slice the potatoes in thin rounds and add them to the cazuela with the rest of the olive oil. Sauté the potatoes until they start to soften and fall apart. Mix in the cooked onions along with the salt, pepper and half of the parsley. Tuck big flakes of the cod into the potato and onion mixture. Top with the pitted olives and bake uncovered in the oven for 30-40 minutes until lightly browned on top. Remove from oven and garnish with wedges of hard boiled eggs and the rest of the parsley. Serve with a green salad and any of the wines below.

Broadbent Vinho Verde $10.99 An excellent example of top quality Vinho Verde. Composed of 50% Loureiro, 40% Trajadura and 10% Padernã it is light in color with lemon and grapefruit aromas. On the palate it offers more citrus as well as a bit of flinty minerality carried along by slight effervescence that makes the wine refreshing and easy to drink.

Ponte de Lima Adamado 2006 $9.99 This Vinho Verde is fresh and a bit fuller bodied than some others from this region. The extra dollop of fruit character is round and generous, adding weight to the flinty/spritzy Vinho Verde style. I pair this with a composed salad of butter lettuce, white asparagus and top shelf Ventresca tuna.

Solar de Serrade Alvarinho 2006 $17.99 In Portugal, Vinho Verde is often thought of (with good reason) as a simple, spritzy white wine for picnics and parties. This Vinho Verde on the other hand is a whole different story. Made from the Alvarinho grape (Albariño in Spain), this elegantly dry and flinty white wine is finely balanced and fragrant. If you are curious about just how good Vinho Verde can be, this is a perfect place to begin your investigation.

Quinta dos Grilos 2005 $15.99 Grilo is Portuguese for cricket, and while you won’t find any crickets in this wine, the flavor may remind you of a warm summer night in the back yard, grilling something tasty, swatting mosquitoes and listening to the (you guessed it) crickets. From the Dao region of Portugal, this red wine is bright and savory, with cherry-like fruit overlaying a tannic core. Chirp!

Primavera Dão 2003 $14.99 The Dao region was once among the most desirable sources of quality red wines in Portugal. These wines were dry and earthy with rich but oxidized fruit character. Over time this style fell out of favor with the international market (the Portuguese still love the old style). Flash forward to the current day and we see some fresh, fragrant Dão wines that still retain some elements of the old style. This wine is a perfect example of how this region is blending modern style with traditional heritage. Fashioned from a blend of Touriga Nacional Tinta Roriz and Touriga Franca, the garnet color and the dark berry fruit character balance fine tannins and background minerality.

Cardeal Reserva 2002 $13.99 This Dão wine is made from 100% Touriga Nacional, one of the traditional varieties used in Porto. This wine was aged in barrel for over a year and has bed come softer and rounder from several years of bottle age. Still, the barrel character gives this wine a bit more of the old school Dão character, blending well with the dark berry fruit. Serve this with some grilled sardines for a traditional pairing.

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