Tag Archives: campo de borja

Red Is Back

It has been a summer full of tasty and interesting white and rosado wines.

We have seen both Basque Txakoli and Catalan Vi D’Agulla in white and pink versions.

Listan Blanco from the Canary Islands made a first appearance here as did white Maria Gomes from Portugal in two versions, sparkling and still.

Bubbly Cava (white as well as rosado) has been particularly popular all summer long.

As we shift into the fall season, I am starting to see new red wines, many of which are coming in at very reasonable prices.

This week we feature red wines that have just arrived in Berkeley. Some of these are familiar labels that have changed to a new vintage, while other familiar brands are now more attractively priced. This week too, we have several red wines that are altogether new at The Spanish Table.

To taste these wines at their best, try this simple and fast recipe that I cobbled together last week from some of the uniquely delicious products from The Spanish Table. This dish relies on the tasty new Barcelos Linguiça (a Portuguese style sausage made nearby in Tracy, California) for flavoring and needs no seasoning other than salt and pepper.

FYI: Joe Barcelos himself will be here in the Berkeley store sampling his products this Sunday, September 7th from 12 noon – 4 pm. Come meet the Linguiça man, taste his wares and then takes some home (along with a few new red wines, of course) and try this recipe.

 

Linguiça and White Beans

Ingredients:

¼ cup – Portuguese extra virgin olive oil

1 cup – thinly sliced onion

3 – sliced piquillo peppers (we have the fresh ones for sale right now)

1 lb. – Barcelos Linguiça (I like the ‘hot’ style)

1jar (23 oz.) – Gutarra brand white beans in brine (I like the young ‘Pochas’ beans)

1 cup – boiling water

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Heat the olive oil in a 10” clay cazuela or sauté pan over medium heat. Add the sliced onions and a small pinch of salt. Sauté the onions until they are soft and starting to brown (about 5 minutes). Slice the Linguiça into bite sized pieces and add to the onions and oil. Sauté the Linguiça until lightly browned (about 10 minutes). Add the sliced piquillo peppers (sauté for 5 minutes if using fresh). Rinse the white beans under running water and add them to the cazuela. Add the boiling water (cold water can crack a hot cazuela) and simmer the whole mixture briefly (two minutes). Adjust the salt and pepper to taste, ladle into bowls and serve with crusty bread and red wine.

Navarro Lopez Old Vines Crianza 2001 500 years ago, if you were a member of the Spanish royal court, you drank wines from the Valdepeñas region that lies south of Toledo. Today, after centuries of obscurity, the region is making a comeback. This wine, made from Tempranillo, is earthy, tart and savory, as is the style in D.O. Valdepeñas. 12 months of barrel age (not something they did 500 years ago) has rounded the flavors, added a bit of tannic complexity and sweet oak aroma to the wine. This traditional, very ‘Spanish tasting’ wine was a good value at $13.99. Now, the price is much better, so we just bought a bunch of it. This is a fine candidate for buying by the box. $8.99

Barbadillo Tinto 2005 The same folks who make Barbadillo Sherries and the ever popular Barbadillo Palomina Fina white wine also make this young red wine from a blend of estate grown Tempranillo, Syrah, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and a local grape called Tintilla. Classified as a Vino de la Tierra de Cadiz, this versatile red wine is tart and youthful with primary grape fruit character and some underlying tannins. $9.99

 

Paso a Paso 2006 Bodegas Volver in D.O. La Mancha makes this lightly oaked (6 months in barrel) Tempranillo that used to be called Mano a Mano in previous vintages. Ripe cherry/blackberry fruit character overlaps with the medium weight oak tannins, creating a unified wine that will bring a bit of Spanish style to a wide range of foods. $10.99

 

Masia de Bielsa Tinto 2007 Earlier this season we featured the Masia de Bielsa rosado. We just received the tinto version of this Garnacha wine from D.O. Campo de Borja that was featured last week in the San Francisco Chronicle (read about it here). This juicy, bright, youthful red, fashioned from old vine fruit sees no time in oak. The ripe berry aroma and tart acidity that one expects from Campo de Borja Garnacha are all to be found in this well composed wine. $10.99

 

Viña Cobos Felino 2007 The Californian winemaker Paul Hobbs crafts this Malbec at his Viña Cobos winery in Argentina. The newest release of Felino is a bold, dark, unfiltered wine that ages for eight months in oak before bottling. Abundant (but not overwhelming) dark berry fruit character blends with flavors of spicy black pepper and foundational minerality. $19.99

 

Primitivo Quiles Raspay Tinto “Brut”2002 We just received the latest vintage of this oh-so-traditional Monastrell from Alicante. Less ripe than most of the Monastrell currently coming from neighboring Jumilla, Raspay is leaner, earthier and lighter in color than Jumilla Monastrell too. Dried cherry and raisin fruit along with savory, earthy flavors characterize this wine. $21.99

 

 

 

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Filed under Argentina, Recipes, Red Wine, Spain

Holiday Wines, Version 1.0

Yes, my friends, it is that time of year again. The eating season is fast approaching, so it’s time to start thinking about big family meals, gift giving and general holiday merrymaking.  Thanksgiving is just two weeks away, with the rest of the annual end of year festivities following close behind.

At this time of year visiting family, friends and business associates all demand more than just your time and attention. They also want to be fed, and alongside something tasty to eat they will want a refreshing glass of something festive with which to toast your hospitality.  With this scenario in mind I offer you version 1.0 of our holiday wine buying guide. As the season progresses we will offer updates and new suggestions, always with the aim of supplying you with the best wines for whatever holiday plans you may have.

This week we focus on some basic requirements for the season; sparkling Cava and top shelf reds.

Cava is such a welcome and well priced wine that I feel it would be a disservice to you if I do not suggest that you pick up a mixed case of this Spanish bubbly to have on hand for organized as well as impromptu holiday get togethers. The prices are right and the wines go with just about anything.

Also popular at this time of year are rich red wines from top notch producers. Few gifts are as welcome as a great bottle of excellent red wine and bosses, clients, coworkers, friends and family members will well remember your thoughtful generosity long after the bottle is empty. And, if you work it right, you may even get to share in the joy of consuming these critically acclaimed celebrity wines (I suggest showing up for dinner with the wine in hand).  

Meanwhile, here is a little recipe from my new favorite cookbook to get you warmed up for even more fun in the kitchen as the season progresses.

 

Calabaza Rehogada-Fried Pumpkin (adapted from 1080 Recipes by Simone & Inés Ortega)

Serves 6 as a side dish

 

3 medium sized leeks

3 lb. pumpkin or butternut squash

1 cup extra virgin olive oil

3-4 slices of bread

3 cloves garlic

Salt

 

Cut leeks into 1 inch pieces and rinse well to remove sand. Peel and deseed pumpkin and cut in 1 inch cubes. Tear bread into 1/2 inch pieces. Cut garlic cloves in half. Simmer pumpkin in salted water until tender. Heat oil in large cazuela and fry bread until golden brown. Remove bread from oil and drain. Pour off all but a few tablespoons of oils and reheat cazuela. Add garlic and fry until brown (but not burnt). Remove garlic from oil and discard. Add leeks, pumpkin and fried bread to cazuela and cook over medium heat stirring often until leeks have softened and pumpkin starts to brown. Remove cazuela from heat, adjust salt and serve.

 

 

Cava:

Mont Ferrant Brut Rosado $14.99 I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating. Few wines make as welcoming and attractive a cocktail as a tall crystal flute full of this dark ruby colored wine. This rosado cava is a Brut wine so it’s quite dry, but a residual aroma of fresh berries adds youthful liveliness to this wine from one of the oldest Cava producers in Spain.

 

1+1=3 Brut $14.99 A traditional blend of Parellada, Macabeo and Xarel-lo grapes creates a crisp sparkling wine with yeasty aroma and bright citrus fruit character. This wine with a funny name is a bit richer in fruit than some (though still a dry wine) which makes it particularly well suited to serving with food.

 

Montsarra Brut $15.99 You may be familiar with this wine as served by the glass since it has long been a favorite of local restaurant and bar owners (they know quality when they taste it). This traditional Cava offers rich, leesy complexity at a very reasonable price. Assertive bubbles, toasty aroma and bright acidity are what you want in a top notch Cava and this one has them all in abundance.

 

Big Reds:

Alto Moncayo 2005 $43.00 Garnacha is the most widely planted red grape in Spain but you won’t find many as good as what Alto Moncayo makes in D.O. Campo de Borja just south of Rioja. Deep ruby color, extracted aromas of ripe berries and a bright, spicy character that is a perfect match for red meat.  Parker gave the 2004 a 94 point score, but has not yet reviewed the new vintage. Tanzer gave the 2005 a 92(+?) point score.  Her at The Spanish Table we don’t do point scores, but we do rate this one as muy tasty.

 

Alion 2003 $75.00 Vega Sicilia Unico is THE iconic Spanish wine from D.O. Ribera del Duero, but with the current 1996 vintage clocking in at $387.00 many of us will never try it. On the other hand, Vega Sicilia also makes Alion, and the new 2003 vintage of this wine is stunning. It’s rich. It’s earthy, it’s complex and powerful and balanced.  Parker gave this wine 94 points and Tanzer gave it 91. You can decide for yourself since we just got the wine last week.  It’s waiting for you.

 

Termanthia 2005 $195.00 This has to be one of the biggest of the big reds of the season. The 2004 vintage received a perfect 100point score from The Wine Advocate, a publication known for its appreciation of big red wines. The 2005 has just been released and, due to high demand, we got just a precious few bottles for our modest little store. Think single small parcel of 100-150 year old ungrafted Tinto de Toro, miniscule yields, extensive barrel age (20 months) in new oak and you start to understand what’s going on here. The 2005 vintage produced just over 4000 bottles of this wine, so demand will be high and quantities will be scarce. Act now if you want some.

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Filed under Recipes, Red Wine, rosado, Spain, Sparkling Wine, White Wine