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Time For Jerez

In my time at The Spanish table I have seen a reoccurring post-holiday phenomenon that I hope to turn into a local tradition. After all the rich, indulgent holiday meals, many of our customers turn to Jerez (Sherry) as their drink of choice in the new year. A small glass of Manzanilla, Amontillado or Oloroso seems to be just what we all want right about now.
These traditional wines, unique to Spain, range from lean and dry to dense and sweet. They pair well with a wide variety of foods and can be enjoyed before, during or after a meal. Locally we have more choices than ever for places to try a glass of Jerez wine. Here in the East Bay we have Barlata and Cesar pouring several by-the-glass selections. In San Francisco, Gitane, Contigo and NOPA are excellent destinations for Jerez sampling. At The Spanish Table we carry a broad selection of Jerez wines to suit all tastes. Here are just a few suggestions to get your new year off to a good start:

La Cigarrera Manzanilla This pale, straw colored wine with aromas of fresh hay and sea breeze is completely dry with yeasty scent and flavor. A few salted almonds, olives or some sliced Jamón Serrano alongside a small chilled glass of Manzanilla is a classic Spanish experience. $11.99 (375ml)

San Leon Reserva de Familia Bodegas Argueso makes several grades of Manzanilla. This version is selected from the best barrels and was originally intended for the personal use of the winemakers’ families. Bracingly dry and nutty, this wine displays freshness, balance and a crisp, precise character found only in the best wines from this region. $32.99

Viña AB Amontillado This amber colored wine from Gonzales Byass is quite dry (some Amontillado can be lightly sweet) with lightly oxidized aromas of walnut/hazelnut and toasted oak. Brandy-like warmth adds to the final experience. $16.99

Sangre y Trabajadero Oloroso
Dark amber/gold in color, this dry Oloroso from the small Gutierrez Colosia winery displays aromas of beach air, wood smoke and toasted walnuts as well as a hint of burnt sugar and whisky barrel on the finish.  $15.99 (375 ml)

Upcoming Events
Special Guest Chef

Barlata in Oakland is hosting a week long appearance by guest chef Albert Assin from Barcelona. Normally Chef Assin can be found behind the counter at Pinotxo, his tapas bar in Barcelona’s Boqueria market.
Visitors to this famed public market will remember Pinotxo as the small bar in the center of the market where hordes of hungry customers spill out into the aisles as they await a chance to sample chef Assin’s food.
Daniel Olivella, the owner of Barlata (and B-44 in San Francisco) invited Assin to do a guest chef stint here after the two teamed up for a few demonstrations of Catalan cuisine at the Worlds Of Flavor conference in Napa this past November.
Chef Assin will be at Barlata this weekend, as well as next week (with some evenings at B-44 in San Francisco too). Check with the good folks at Barlata (510-450-0678) for exact times and details.

Cooking Class

The recent release of the long awaited cookbook Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking by Paula Wolfert has spurred renewed interest in the terracotta cazuelas, ollas and cocotes that we sell here. We did a clay pot class a few years ago at Kitchen On Fire cooking school in Berkeley and now that class is happening again.
Cooking in clay is an ancient way to transform simple ingredients into delicious meals. All of the fantastic foods for this class, from quick cooked appetizers to slow braised stews and even dessert, will be prepared using Spanish clay cookware.
The date for this class is Monday February 8th at 6:30 pm. Registration is exclusively through Kitchen On Fire, on their web site or by phone at (510)-548-COOK (2665). The class is limited to 30 participants so early registration is advised.

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Filed under events, Fortified Wine, Spain

Spain in California

Every school kid in California learns about the Spanish heritage of this part of the world, going back to the days of ‘Alta California’ and ‘El Camino Reál’, but the names of Spanish explorers of the American west coast, names like De Anza, Cabrillo and Portola are no longer associated with historic figures. In modern times these Spanish family names are given to streets, shopping centers and housing sub-divisions. California’s Spanish history is, it seems, hiding in plain sight.

I’m currently reacquainting myself with the vestiges of colonial Spain here in the Bay Area and have noticed that (unlike the Spanish explorers from previous centuries) Spanish food and wine heritage is very much in evidence at present. In particular, this week I want to draw your attention to a few upcoming local events that highlight our shared Spanish history.

First up is a taste of ‘Alta California’ thanks to an enterprising group that goes by the name of ‘TAPAS’, which stands for Tempranillo Advocates, Producers and Amigos Society (hey, it’s a stretch, but it works). According to their website this local organization “is dedicated to the promotion and enjoyment of wines made from all native Iberian grape varietals.”

If you want to experience what the Spanish explorers left behind (other than place names) you can try various wines made from grapes such as Tempranillo, Garnacha, Verdejo and Albariño grown right here in California (and elsewhere in the USA) at an event hosted by TAPAS on Saturday August 9th at Copia (the wine/food museum) in Napa. Billed as “the most extensive tasting of American produced Iberian grape varietals ever offered”, this promises to be a detailed look at how domestic winemakers are responding to the current interest in all things Iberian.

Next in line for a little bit of the  California/Spain mashup treatment is a TV show (the cultural net gets widely cast around here) featuring our favorite dish, Paella, as prepared by local paellero to the stars, Gerard Nebesky. 

On Wednesday July 30th (9 pm PST) The Food Network will air an episode of Throwdown with Bobby Flay wherein the famous New York chef, restaurateur and TV personality will compete against Gerard Nebesky in a round of dueling Paellas.

The show was shot a few months ago in San Francisco and the final dishes created by Señores Flay y Nebesky were judged by Daniel Olivella, Executive Chef of B44 Restaurant in San Francisco as well as by our very own Andy Booth, co-owner of The Spanish Table (these guys know more than a thing or two about paella). Everyone involved in the show was sworn to secrecy about the final result (backed up by signed non-disclosure agreements) so we don’t yet know who actually prevailed in the competition. All will be revealed next Wednesday evening when the show airs for the first time.

For a first hand experience with Gerard’s Paella you can attend a big screen viewing of ‘Throwdown’ during the Wednesday June 30th broadcast, accompanied by the real thing. Gerard will be making his signature paella at Bistro de Copains in Occidental (Sonoma County) for a select group of Paella aficionados. For $30 you get paella, salad and the show, as well as the chance to rub elbows with a genuine TV star (Gerard, not Bobby). Reservations are required for this event. You can contact them by phone at (707)-874-2436.

Here in Berkeley we are excited to announce the arrival of new vintages from some favorite wineries as well as a few totally new items that we are very happy to share with you. What follows are my recommendations from the latest arrivals at The Spanish table in Berkeley.

 

Muga Blanco 2007 The newest vintage of Bodegas Muga’s popular white wine has arrived.  Made from 90% Viura and 10% Malvasia, briefly aged for 4 months in French oak, this wine is poised between the rich, fleshy style of barrel aged white wine and the crisp, herbal style of the same wine aged in tank. The oak never dominates but only adds a touch of complexity to this excellent and well priced wine. $18.99

 

Muga Rosado 2007 Another perennial customer favorite from Muga is this rosado wine made from Tempranillo, Garnacha and, interestingly, a bit of white Viura too. This pale pink wine is crisp and lean, not cloying and fruity. The bright acidity and gentle berry-like fruit character maintain a fine balance of berry/citrus aromas and flavors. $14.99

 

Parés Baltà Ros de Pacs 2007 If you are looking for a tasty organic rosado for serving at your dinner table or sipping on your back porch, then consider this dark and fruity wine from the Penedès region of Catalunya. This blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot is full of strawberry aroma and flavor, with sufficient acidity to keep the wine bright and refreshing. $11.99

 

Sur Bonarda 2006 We just got a great deal on a stack of this Argentine red wine from a high quality producer in the Mendoza region. The indigenous Bonarda grape produces dark, full bodied wines.  This wine is 100% Bonarda. It is garnet colored and expressive, with blackberry fruit character balancing the amargo back note that Bonarda is known for. $10.99

 

Capote Velho What A bargain! This non-vintage red wine from who knows where in Portugal has absolutely no pedigree but really delivers on freshness and versatility. This is a full liter of wine that possesses gentle berry-like fruit character and moderate tannins coupled with a moderate level of alcohol (11.5%). Like a no name house wine in a little Portuguese bar or restaurant, this red tastes great by itself and will also accompany, but not overshadow, a broad range of foods. $11.99 (1 Liter)

 

Grilos 2005 This red wine from the Dão region in Portugal is an excellent example of the improvements taking place in the region. No longer home to just funky/earthy/rustic reds, winemakers in the Dão region now make many bright and intriguing wines such as this blend of Touriga Nacional and Alfrocheiro grapes that age for a mere 6 months in oak before bottling. Tart red berry fruit character and lightly oaked tannic core combine with aromas of pomegranate and wet stones. Was $15.99, now $12.99

 

Vina Alberdi Reserva 2001 The wines of La Rioja Alta are among the most traditionally styled of Rioja reds. The new Viña Alberdi, from the superlative 2001 vintage, has just arrived. Odd label change (blue skinned matrons in red sun dresses sipping wine) notwithstanding, this old school Rioja is brick red in  color with toasty barrel aromas along with notes of cigar box, cedar and minerals. Pie cherry and dark plum fruit character are in balance with the other elements. This is an excellent choice for long term cellaring but is drinking very well right now if given some air before service. $24.99

 

 

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Filed under Argentina, Portugal, Red Wine, rosado, Spain, White Wine