Tag Archives: galicia

New 2010 Albariño

We are receiving numerous new white wines in the 2010 vintage, among them several fabulous Albariño wines from the coastal Rías Baixas region in Galicia. Here are just a few suggestions to get you going:

pazo_senorans__268502010 Pazo Señorans Albariño

The 2010 Pazo Señorans is a standard setting example for top quality Albariño. The interplay of floral aromas and flinty minerality creates an intriguing and refreshing expression of Galician soil and climate. Hints of tropical fruit, green herbs, and granite dust add to the rich complexity of this wine. An ideal pairing is seafood (of course!).  Try it with a salad topped with broad flakes of ventresca tuna or, the Spanish favorite, some braised pulpo (octopus) with pimenton and potatoes. $22.99


img_0217__765152010 Igrexario de Saiar Albariño

Benito Santos is a small producer from Rias Baixas that focuses on natural winemaking and on highlighting the unique terroir of the region.  All of the wines are certified organic and are hand crafted, using native yeasts and very little manipulation.  The 2010 Igrexario de Saiar Albariño is ripe and balanced, with notes of peaches, green apples, white flowers, and tropical fruit.  It’s soft texture is countered by great acid that keeps the flavors fresh and lively. $17.99

sete cepas 2010 Sete Cepas Albariño

Sete Cepas is a fresh, young 100% Albariño wine that really delivers on quality at a very reasonable price. The most striking feature of this wine is its finely tuned balance of bright, lively fruit character set against a background of flinty minerality. This combination is found in all the best wines from the Rías Baixas region. The mental image it conjures up is of freshly sliced grapefruit served on a bed of crushed seashells. This wine will surely be a contender for most popular white wine of the summer. $13.99

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Filed under Spain, White Wine

D.O. Monterrei – Lobarzán & Ladairo

Let us focus on a specific wine region; DO Monterrei, located in Northwestern Spain just across the border from Portugal. Granted D.O. status only in 1994, Monterrei is home to hot weather and deep red clay soil. Small family wineries, not big industrial producers, are the norm in this diminutive region. Just 20 wineries operate here, making wine from 1700 acres of vineyard land. This little known area is usually thought of (when it is thought of at all) as a source of fresh white wines made from Godello and Treixadura grapes. The red wines are less well known, but share much in common with reds from neighboring DO Bierzo and DO Ribeira Sacra. The Mencía grape is the predominant red variety here and most of the wines are fermented in tank, forgoing the barrel ageing regimens so common in other parts of Spain.
We are focused on red wines from Monterrei because they offer a different perspective on Spanish wine. Lighter in tone than the wines from the rocky, arid heartland, the wines from Northwestern Spain have a lean purity and (often, though not always) a moderate level of alcohol that is refreshing in these days of big, bold reds. I find similarities here to the reds of the Loire valley in France (another region known mostly for its white wines), with firm minerality, tart fruit character and quirky individuality.
Castro de Lobarzán is a small family winery located in the home of José Fernández Feijóo (3rd generation winemaker) near the small town of Vilaza. He and his family personally work 11 acres of vineyard land to grow the fruit for their wines. The small winery, located in what amounts to a large garage adjacent to the family home, produces both a white Godello/Treixadura blend as well as a red that combines Mencía with the local clone of Tempranillo called Arauxa (ar-ow-sha). Lobarzán Tinto 2006 is a fifty-fifty blend of Mencía and Arauxa, aged briefly in tank before bottling (no room for oak barrels in the family garage/winery). A few years of bottle age has mellowed this wine a bit from its original firmly flinty incarnation. The twiggy/leafy character of Mencía adds contrast to the cherry/berry fruit of the Arauxa, while a bit of loamy funk can be found lurking in the background here. When first released last year this was a $20 +/- wine, but the world is not yet clamoring for DO Monterrei reds so the importer José Pastor made us a deal on the remaining stock. We are selling the rest of the vintage (not much of it left) at $11.99.
Adegas Ladairo (‘Bodega’ becomes ‘Adega’ in Galicia) was founded in 1984 by Jose Luiz Vaz Vilela in O Rosal (not to be confused with the coastal town of the same name) near Oimbra in DO Monterrei. Ladairo Mencía 2007 is a monovarietal wine that is fermented in tank (they do a barrel aged version as well). This light bodied red displays tart cranberry fruit character and earthy minerality. A bit closed at first, the wine expresses its full nature with a quick decantation. This simple, young wine will find a good match with lighter meals such as rice or pasta where meat is not at the center of the plate. Originally priced around $17, this too comes from Jose Pastor at a special reduced price of $9.99

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Filed under Red Wine, Spain, Uncategorized

Sidra

It will come as no surprise to you, brave readers of this newsletter, that the food and wine traditions from Spain are currently quite popular on this side of the Atlantic Ocean. Thanks to retailers like The Spanish Table, many unique and delicious Spanish products are finding their way into American kitchens and dining rooms, often for the first time.

In spite of all the recent attention, some of Spain’s regional specialties are still hard to find in the USA. The famous Pata Negra ham, for instance, has only just become available here. Wines from lesser known regions are found only in specialty shops like The Spanish Table.

One product that has been noticeably absent from the US market is the traditional hard apple cider from Spain’s northern coastal regions, specifically the sagardo (sidra in Spanish) from the Basque region along the border with France.

Happily, this tart, yeasty farm house cider has begun to take hold here in America. A few weeks ago I announced the arrival of the Basque cider made by Bereziartua, fulfilling a multi-year quest to find, buy and offer this product for sale to our customers. Today we have just received yet another sagardo, this one by Isastegi. Add to this the traditional sparkling cider from Asturias in three styles (one hard cider and two non-alcoholic versions) that we have carried for years and together they constitute the largest collection of sidra/sagardo on the west coast.

“So what’s the big deal with cider” you may ask?

Like Manzanilla in Jerez or Txakoli in Basque Country, the sagardo tradition is best experienced first hand. The place to learn about this traditional beverage is at a Sagardotegi, the typical cider mill that can be found all across the Basque region.

These businesses are usually part family residence, part cider mill and part seasonal restaurant. In the springtime, barrels of freshly fermented cider are tapped for thirsty crowds that gather for a taste of the new vintage as well as for the traditional Sagardotegi meal of omelets, salt cod with fried green peppers, thick bone-in rib eye steaks grilled over charcoal and walnuts in the shell with honey and cheese for dessert. This meal is usually eaten standing up so as to accommodate frequent trips to the barrel room for refills.

To get an idea of how this works, check out this video made at Bereziartua Sagardotegi. To acquaint yourself with (or revisit) the true flavor of basque sagardo, come pick up one of our two new brands of hard cider and pour them with the following recipe.

Chistorra con Sidra (basque chorizo braised in apple cider)

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon, Spanish extra virgin olive oil

1/2 cup, thinly sliced white onion

1 lb. basque style chistorra sausage

1 cup, basque apple cider

1 bay leaf

Instructions:

Heat the olive oil in a 10” clay cazuela (or sauté pan). Add the sliced onions to the oil and sauté over medium heat for 5 minutes until the onions get soft and start to brown. Slice the long, skinny chistorra (sometimes spelled Txistorra) into bit sized pieces and brown lightly in the hot oil for about 6-8 minutes. If you are using a clay cazuela, bring the cider and bay leaf to a simmer in a separate pan and then add the hot liquid to the cazuela (adding cold liquid to a hot cazuela can crack it). If you are using a sauté pan you can add the cider straight to the pan without preheating it. Simmer the sausages in the cider for 20-30 minutes until the liquid is reduced by half. Serve hot with some bread on the side to sop up the juices, and more cider to wash it all down.

Isastegi Sagardo This traditional Basque apple cider is cloudy gold colored with yeasty fermented aroma and tart apple flavor. This unfiltered artisan cider displays just a hint of sweet apple character along with apple skin tartness filling in the rest of the flavor profile. At six percent alcohol this makes a nice alternative to beer on a hot afternoon. $11.99

Bereziartua Sagardo This hard cider is unfiltered, cloudy, lightly effervescent and only barely sweet. Yeasty aroma and tart fermented apple flavor are what you want from this most ancient of drinks. In the Basque Country they drink it straight from the barrel in early spring and the rest of the year they drink from bottles like those we have just received. When this stuff becomes wildly popular, remember, you heard it here first. $8.99

El Gaitero Sidra Asturiana This is the most widely recognized brand of sparkling hard cider from the Asturias region on the north coast of Spain. Clear gold color, abundant effervescence and sweet red apple fruit character make this a favorite at parties and family gatherings in Asturias and elsewhere in Spain. $8.99

La Gaita Sidra $2.99

El Gaitero Verde $3.99

El Gaitero in Asturias makes several non-alcoholic apple ciders that are very similar to the regular El Gaitero in flavor, but without the booze. Pretty champagne style bottles with old style labels on the outside, lots of bubbles and sweet apple flavor on the inside.

New arrivals in the wine department:

Salneval Albariño 2007 This younger sibling to the ever popular Condes de Albarei is a fine example of well priced Albariño. Melon and citrus fruit character balances gentle minerality in this wine. Recently The New York Times praised this wine among several other Albariño wines from the Rías Baixas region, saying “Pleasing, with flavors of white peaches, cantaloupe and lemon.” You can read more of this informative article here. $10.99

Ameztoi Txakoli – Upelean Hartzitua 2007 This is the limited edition Ameztoi Txakoli that spends some time ageing in large neutral oak foudres. Made from the Hondarribi Zuri grape just like the regular Ameztoi, this wine displays the typical flinty minerality and green apple fruit character of Txakoli along with a subtle bit of rich texture and leesy aroma imparted by the big barrels. $18.99

Altos de La Hoya 2006 This wine from Jumilla has always been a benchmark Monastrell from Spain. Ungrafted old vines with fat and lush flavors of deep, sweet dark berries, some black pepper and just a touch of baked earth. Great concentration and richness. This tastes like a much more expensive wine than it is. $12.99

Juan Gil 2006 We just got in the new vintage of this popular Monastrell from Jumilla, made by Miguel Gil, one of the pioneers of this grape and this region. Dark color and concentrated blackberry aroma create the first impression, leading on to sweet dark berry fruit character and a touch of grape skin tannin. A fine example of a pure Monastrell wine. $16.99

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Filed under Recipes, Red Wine, sidra (cider), Spain, White Wine