Monthly Archives: January 2009

More New Wines From Spain

Did you see the interesting article last week in the (soon to be extinct) SF Chronicle Friday wine section? Jon Bonné wrote a nice piece on Sherry and the current resurgence of Sherry based cocktails. He quotes Andy Booth (one of the owners of The Spanish Table) but neglects to mention that The Spanish Table has the most extensive collection of Jerez wine in the Bay Area. The article also quotes Felipe Gonzalez-Gordon, the great-great grand son of Manuel Maria Gonzalez who founded the iconic Gonzalez-Byass winery best known for Tio Pepe Fino. Felipe was in town a few weeks ago and was the congenial and informative special guest at a Jerez dinner put on by The Spanish Table at César in Oakland. If you missed the dinner (don’t worry, we’ll do more events like that in the months ahead) we have some of the wines from the event listed this week in the wine notes below, as well as some of the favorites listed in the Chronicle article.

Happily, the rain has returned to the Bay Area, lending more credence to my ceaseless chatter about food and wine for winter.  Coinciding with the return of colder/wetter weather are some new arrivals here that are particularly appropriate to the season. In addition to the previously mentioned Jerez wines we have a few bold, expressive red wines that will compliment slow cooked meat and/or vegetable stews and other seasonal fare.

Paella Class: I mentioned last week (and it bears repeating) that the first paella and wine class of the year is coming up at Kitchen on Fire cooking school here in Berkeley. The date is Monday February 23rd at 6:30 pm. The cost is $65 per person and includes hands-on instruction to create several tapas and a large paella mixta, all of which will be consumed during the class. Several paella-friendly Spanish wines will also be sampled. Kitchen on Fire is handling the signup for this fun and popular class. Go to their website for more details.

Cyan Crianza 2002 This textbook Toro displays dark garnet color, dense texture and heady aromas of black coffee, cherry brandy and tannic oak. The flavor is ripe and bold, with black cherry fruit character and notes of cocoa powder and coffee bean on the finish. Made from the fruit of 20-30 year old Tinto de Toro vines, this wine normally sells for $21.99 but is now available for $14.99.

Aresan Roble 2002 This wine is a blend of Tempranillo and Cabernet Sauvignon.  The estate grown fruit is harvested by hand and carefully sorted before crushing and fermentation. After three months of barrel age, the wine is bottled and put back in the cellar to rest for a year before shipment to market. Aresan Roble is a bold wine that displays dark color, aromas of cigar box and ripe berries, rich fruit character and earthy tannins. The wine starts out firm and structured, becoming more elegant and complex as it opens. $16.99

Penya Cadiella 2004 Here’s a big, ripe, expressive blend of Tempranillo, Monastrell and Cabernet Sauvignon, lightly oaked (6 months) and ready to drink. If you have enjoyed the Monastrell wines from Jumilla, Valencia or Alicante then this will be familiar to you. We have just a few bottles left of this vintage which are discounted off of the normal $17.99 price. $14.99

Tio Pepe (375ml) Sure, I know that Tio Pepe is the world’s best loved Fino Sherry, but I just added the small 37s ml bottles to our collection (why didn’t I do this long ago?) and want to let everyone know that this bracingly dry, crisp, nutty wine is now available in a dinner-for-two size. $8.99 (375ml)

Gonzalez Byass Alfonso Oloroso The big hit of our recent Gonzalez-Byass wine dinner, this mahogany colored oloroso sherry is nutty and rich, with just the barest hint of raisin-like fruit character. Serve this wine with a cheese plate or all by itself as a warming after dinner cocktail. $16.99

Barbadillo San Rafael Oloroso Dulce Jon Bonné described this wine quite well in his recent article on Sherry in the San Francisco Chronicle. He said: “Most sweetened olorosos are simply known as cream, but a few still label themselves as amoroso, including this dramatic, delicious bottle. Tart, leathery scents of crushed toffee candy and stones, with a molasses sweetness cut through by the sharp tang of long-aged sherry.” $19.99

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Filed under Fortified Wine, Red Wine, Spain

Reboot

For many of the less technically inclined among us the on/off button is our solution to all electronic device issues. Everything has them these days (computers, phones, televisions, even cars). When in doubt, start over from scratch by turning everything off and back on again. The circle with a vertical line sticking out from the top is the modern ideogram for renewal (not, as I first imagined, the international symbol for coconut with a straw in it).

After a busy holiday season and a brief break from the newsletter action (by the end of December I was all talked out so I took a few weeks off for some personal defragmentation) it’s time to hit the restart button and share anew with you the ongoing excitement of the Iberian wine world.

New wines from Spain, Portugal and Latin America are arriving weekly here and the year ahead looks very promising. Improved currency exchange rates and lower fuel costs are leading to some price reductions in imported wines while the current renaissance in Iberian winemaking is both fostering innovative new wines as well as creating markets for traditional styles that were previously unknown outside their regions of origin.

At The Spanish Table we continue to bring you a selection of high quality wines at all price levels. In the year ahead we will also post more recipes, offer additional classes and organize new events to share the distinctive flavors of Spain and Portugal with you, our loyal customers.

This week brings a new version of a traditional recipe, the announcement of an upcoming class that we offer only 3 times a year and the release of some of the most anticipated wines of the season. Onward!

Lentejas Con Chorizo (Lentils with Chorizo sausage) is a popular home-style dish in Spain. This dense, meaty stew is perfect cold weather fare. I have lightened up the texture to create a soup that delivers the same flavors in a brothy version more appropriate to our moderate climate. This soup can be made in a vegetarian version by omitting the chorizo and adding a bit more smoked paprika.

 

Lentil Soup with (or without) Chorizo

(makes 6-8 portions)

Ingredients:                                                                                                                                                          1 lb. dried Spanish Pardina lentils (approximately 2 cups)

2 qt. water

1 bay leaf

1 large yellow onion

2 ribs of celery (1 rib yields approximately 1/2 cup)

3 tablespoons Spanish extra virgin olive oil

1 large leek (yields approximately 1½ cups)

2 large carrots (yields approximately 3/4 cup)

4 oz. Spanish style chorizo sausage (optional) (yields approximately 1 cup)

1 teaspoon Spanish Sweet smoked paprika (1 ½ teaspoons for the vegetarian version)

1 teaspoon whole cumin

1 tablespoon sea salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper.

2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley or cilantro

2 tablespoons Spanish sherry vinegar

Directions:

Rinse the dried lentils under fresh water to remove any dust or dirt. Cut the onion in quarters leaving the skin on. Roughly chop one of the ribs of celery. Combine the rinsed lentils, bay leaf, onion and celery with 2 quarts of cold water in a soup pot (preferably a Spanish earthenware olla). Bring the pot to a boil on the stove and then simmer for 30-45 minutes or until the lentils are just cooked through. Remove and discard the bay leaf, onion and celery.

Finely dice the leek, carrot, remaining celery and chorizo (if using). In a separate pan heat the olive oil and sauté the diced vegetables and chorizo for 5 minutes. Add the salt, pepper, cumin and paprika to the pan and sauté the spices briefly to release their flavors. Add the contents of the sauté pan to the soup pot and simmer for another 30-40 minutes. Mince the parsley or cilantro and add to the pot along with the Sherry vinegar. Adjust the salt to taste and serve with grilled whole grain bread and a nice bottle of red wine.

 

 

Paella Class: The first paella and wine class of the year is coming up at Kitchen on Fire cooking school here in Berkeley. The date is Monday February 23rd at 6:30 pm. The cost is $65 per person and includes hands-on instruction to create several tapas and a large paella mixta, all of which will be consumed during the class. Several paella-friendly Spanish wines will also be sampled. Kitchen on Fire is handling the signup for this fun and popular class. Go to their website for more details.

Ameztoi Txakoli – Upelean Hartzitua 2007 This is the limited edition Ameztoi Txakoli that spends some time ageing in large neutral oak foudres. Made from the Hondarribi Zuri grape just like the regular Ameztoi, this wine displays the typical flinty minerality and green apple fruit character of Txakoli along with a subtle bit of rich texture and leesy aroma imparted by the big barrels. $18.99

Nomad 2005 Jeff Jarvis and Jessica Tomei are husband and wife winemakers working in the Sierra foothills (Jarvis Tomei Syrah) as well as in Chile where, along with fellow American T.J. Evans, they make Nomad from a blend of 75 % Cabernet Sauvignon, 16 % Syrah, 7 % Carmenère and 2 % Malbec. This ripe, spicy red is finely tuned and expressive with moderate barrel character and smooth texture. This small production bottling (2,000 cases in total) will reawaken your interest in Chilean wine. $14.99

 

Esboço Douro 2005 This young red wine from the Portuguese Douro Valley is made up of mostly Tinta Roriz and Touriga Franca along with a whole laundry list of other Douro grapes as is the tradition in this ancient region where field blending is the norm. Dark color and earthy aroma create a first impression much in keeping with traditional Portuguese style augmented here with ripe, youthful fruit character that is not so common in wines from this region. $14.99

 

Finca Valpiedra Reserva 2004 The new vintage of this single vineyard Rioja has just arrived. Composed of the fruit of one large contiguous vineyard in the heart of DOC Rioja (extremely rare in a region full of tiny vineyard parcels) this reserve level wine is 90% Tempranillo with the remaining 10% made up of Graciano, Mazuelo and Cabernet Sauvignon. Dark ruby/garnet color, moderate oak barrel aroma and dark berry fruit character. 18 months of barrel age gives the wine a tannic core that has softened over the years. This smooth, opulent, plush Rioja is tilted toward a more modern style (more fruit, less wood) without loosing sight of the traditional aged reserva character that the wine is rightfully famous for. At first release this wine was pushing $40 but things are looking better now. $28.99

 

Clio 2006 The “it wine” of the moment, this  blend of old vineMonastrell and Cabernet Sauvignon from DO Jumilla has received some out of the ballpark reviews since its first vintage in 2002. Customers call from across the country looking for this full-bodied, plush wine that combines layer upon layer of spice, vivid fruit and oak. We just got a small allocation from the distributor, most likely the only one for the year and are offering it on a first-come-first-served basis.  $47.99

 

El Nido 2006 The elder sibling of Clio. Using more Cabernet Sauvignon and less Monastrell in the blend (from the estate’s best fruit) adds a firmer tannic element to the complex and ripe fruit character. This wine is built for long term storage and will really start to show its best side in 6-8 years. Extremely limited, we have a mere 8 bottles to offer. Again, no limits on purchase quantities while supply lasts. $148.00

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Filed under Chile, Portugal, Recipes, Red Wine, Spain, White Wine